GPA v Degree Class: a “Goldilocks” solution?

As UK looks at GPA, US considers degree class

There has been a debate in UK Higher Education for the past few years about the merits of moving away from traditional degree classifications to a US style Grade Point Average (GPA). A recent piece in the Guardian notes the arguments for moving to GPA in the UK:

Employers say that it is very difficult to differentiate between students. The 2:1 degree classification, for example, fails to distinguish between someone who attained 60%, and another who achieved 69.9%. In a competitive jobs market, employers want more information about the candidates they are considering for jobs. This means knowing whether candidates came at the low or high end of a classification. Moving to a grade point average would give that extra detail, showing students’ average grade to two decimal points as they proceed through their degree.

There are many other positive arguments too and a group of universities is currently involved in trialling the approach alongside current models.
grads
It is more than a little surprising therefore to see an argument about moving the other way.  A piece in The Atlantic by Heidi Tworek is quoted by EAB and looks at the merits of moving from GPA to UK-style degree classification in order to address grade inflation. The so-called “Goldilocks” solution:

Other schools have gone to the opposite extreme. Bennington College and Reed College, along with eight others, have abolished grades altogether. Tworek argues that the best solution is somewhere between the existing models—a “Goldilocks” solution that bridges the extremes. And she thinks it might be found already at universities in England. In the United Kingdom, students receive one of only three marks: first, second, or third. Second is by far the most common grade; 76% of students graduate with a second-designated degree. Only the truly exceptional students—about 19%—receive a first-class degree. The system carries several benefits, argues Tworek. Employers do not look down on second-marked degrees, generally accepting it as a mark of quality. Furthermore, the simpler system “removes the narcissism inherent in minor differences,” she writes. Finally, the system still distinguishes degrees just enough to give students, teachers, and employers a sense of the student’s performance.

Similar arguments are therefore deployed in both cases with proponents suggesting that employers will like the results better, grade inflation will be challenged and differentiation between students enhanced. So, GPA or degree classification, which way will it go?

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A campus facilities arms race?

It’s all about the aquatics apparently

I’ve posted before about the growth of luxury student accommodation in the US. Now the Education Advisory Board has a report on what it says amounts to a recreation facilities arms race on US campuses:

A paw shaped hot tub you say? Essential.

A paw shaped hot tub you say? Essential.

Auburn University has a 45-person paw-print shaped hot tub, Pensacola Christian College has a $1 million wave rider, Missouri State University has a zip-line over the pool and a lazy river. Ten schools have AquaClimb pool-side rock walls, 35 more are in the works. According to a 2013 NIRSA study, 92 schools reported a combined $1.7 billion in capital projects.”Aquatics are a huge growth area,” says Jack Patton, leader of RDG Planning and Design’s sports facilities group. They are also the most expensive part of a recreation center to run per square foot.

Officials hope that the amenities will help them stand out in prospective students’ minds.It works. Resort-style facilities boost student enrollment, particularly at less-elite schools, according to a 2013 study from the National Bureau of Economic Research.At the University of Missouri, each tour stops by the “indoor beach club’s” palm trees, lazy river, waterfall, and grotto modeled after the Playboy Mansion’s.

"The floating lounge chairs, couches, mellow music and plenty of sun help provide a perfect relaxing environment for hard-working students who need a respite from their studies or a change of scenery."

“The floating lounge chairs, couches, mellow music and plenty of sun help provide a perfect relaxing environment for hard-working students who need a respite from their studies or a change of scenery.”

The arms race metaphor is a good one. Is all of this necessary to deliver a good student experience? No, but it does seem to help with recruitment. More palm trees anyone?